So, Vladivostok…

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…at last we meet.

After more than ten thousand kilometres by rail and sea (I’ll figure out exactly how many some day) I hit Vladivostok before dawn this morning. And promptly went for an espresso to wake me up. I need a shower and a change of clothes. Possibly a change of skin too. We’ll see.

The San Francisco of the East is building its own Golden Gate to connect the east and west halves of the city. There are few things more delicate-looking than half-completed bridges, and this one was doubly so this morning, wreathed in mist and silhouetted against the eastern sky. When it’s finished, it will be magnificent, soaring over the city’s main street. For now, it’s a massive building site, but still magnificent in its own way.

I’d hate to be the person who has to climb to work each day in one of those high cranes though…

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The Mystery of the Dunnes Stores Bags

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I’m about to drop off the edge of the Internet for a while again, on a three day trip from Ulan Ude to Vladivostok. Before I go though, I leave you with a mystery.

A long time ago, when I was in Moscow, I spotted a granny on the Metro, carrying her groceries in a familiar-looking bag. Closer inspection revealed that it was indeed a Dunnes Stores “Bag for Life”. Weird, I thought, and kept on about my business.

Except that I’ve seen them a few times since then, all across Russia. The one in my possession, pictured above, came from a Russian tour guide, who said that her company had handed them out to its staff.

So just why are Dunnes Stores bags so popular behind the former Iron Curtain? Do they have prized aesthetic or structural qualities? Do their owners dream of coming to Ireland and shopping under the hallowed green banner one day? Or did Dunnes just make far too many of the things and flog them off to foreign markets to recoup some cash?

Answers on a postcard please. (Don’t send them anywhere, just write them on a postcard.)

A Snack Fit For a Khan

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I could have posted a photo of eagles or vultures. Of yaks or Mongolian ponies. Of Turtle Rock or the sun rising over the hills of Terejl National Park. But no, this was my first encounter with Mongolia, so you get it too.

It amused the hell out of me, both for the Star Trek reference and the fact that, having had a snack box at work for the past 12 years, it does look like they’re the local franchise of Ireland’s famous King Crisps. Sadly, that’s about the only way they resemble them, as they have an appearance and texture not dissimilar to polystyrene packaging pellets.

Right now I’m in a cafe in Ulaanbaatar, having spent last night in a ger camp and yesterday trying all sorts of Mongolian activities, from archery to anklebones, with a little horseriding thrown in too. I’m off to museums this afternoon, then heading out in search of Mongolian beer.

And yes, photos of all of those other things will appear on Flickr before too long. I’m not whimsical all the time…

Wasted in Irkutsk

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I’m currently sitting in a train station in Irkutsk, about as tired as I’ve been so far this trip. Which is a neat trick, seeing as I’ve spent the last two days by the shores of Lake Baikal, in a room in a log cabin with the balcony view above, enjoying sunshine on a par with the best Irish summer day, doing nothing more strenuous than going for a dip. Yes, it was bloody cold, but still.

In about an hour, I’ll be jumping on a train to Mongolia, specifically Ulan Bator, where I’ll spend a night in a get and a night in the city before hopping on the train once more. If I have anywhere near the amount of luck I’ve been having so far on this trip, I’ll be flying. (In this very waiting room, I ran into a couple travelling the opposite way, who were able to give me some pointers on the Japan portion of my trip, having just spent two years there.)

Anyhow, night is falling, and I must be off. Will do my best to keep the updates coming, wherever I and the Internet happen to intersect.

This is where I’ve been…

…for the past four days.

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I’m currently chilling by the shores of Lake Baikal. Literally – the first fingers of the Siberian winter can be felt now, even though the sun has been out all day.

In lieu of a real update, some cheering words from one of my heroes, from the postscript to his “Voyage of the Beagle”, which I managed to finish somewhere in the vicinity of Perm. Definitely spoke to my particular situation.

“But I have too deeply enjoyed the voyage, not to recommend any naturalist, although he must not expect to be so fortunate in his companions as I have been, to take all chances, and to start, on travels by land if possible, if otherwise, on a long voyage. He may feel assured, he will meet with no difficulties or dangers, excepting in rare cases, nearly so bad as he beforehand anticipates. In a moral point of view, the effect ought to be, to teach him good-humoured patience, freedom from selfishness, the habit of acting for himself, and of making the best of every occurrence. In short, he ought to partake of the characteristic qualities of most sailors. Travelling ought also to teach him distrust; but at the same time he will discover, how many truly kind-hearted people there are, with whom he never before had, or ever again will have any further communication, who yet are ready to offer him the most disinterested assistance.”

Not my ride, unfortunately…

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Sadly, my travels from here on won’t involve replicas of the Soviet Space Shuttle. At least I assume it’s a replica. Seeing as I’m in Moscow right now, one can’t entirely be sure. Still, it’s a very cool thing to find by the river in Gorky Park, or Park Kultury as it’s more properly called. (And to demonstrate my cultural bankruptcy, every time I think of the words “Gorky Park”, I don’t think of classic novels but rather the Scorpions’ “Wind of Change”. For shame…)

Anyhow, there are plenty of folks on wheels in the park – roller blades, scooters and bikes. And tomorrow I’ll take to some iron wheels of my own: a four-day expedition by train to Central Asia, specifically Irkutsk and Lake Baikal.

St. Petersburg and Moscow have eased me into the Russian travel experience, but this is where my traveller’s credentials get tested. And given my recent troubles ordering dinner, that could be a test I’ll flunk. Still, there’s nothing like a challenge to force you to step up your game. And my game may benefit from some time in the wilderness. I’ll see you on the other side of the Internet…

New Addictions

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Tripling down on the Russian options at Pelmeny restaurant on Voznesensky Prospekt. From left to right: Kvass (very tasty), Siberian Pelemeni in butter (even tastier) and borsch (spicy and warming). I may not have the hang of the language yet, but I could survive eating like a Russian quite comfortably…

Travels, Reviews, and Assorted Musings